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What is Quantum Computer?

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Quantum Computer

To Know More about Quantum Computer, Read the Given Below Article.

For most of our history, human technology consisted of our brains, fire, and sharp sticks. While fire and sharp sticks became power plants and nuclear weapons, the biggest upgrade has happened to our brains. Since the 1960’s, the power of our brain machines has kept growing exponentially, allowing computers to get smaller and more powerful at the same time. But this process is about to meet its physical limits.

Computer parts are approaching the size of an atom. To understand why this is a problem, we have to clear up some basics.

A computer is made up of very simple components doing very simple things. 

Representing data, the means of processing it, and control mechanisms. Computer chips contain modules, which contain logic gates, which contain transistors.

A transistor is the simplest form of a data processor in computers, basically, a switch that can either block or open the way for information coming through. This information is made up of bits which can be set to either 0 or 1. Combinations of several bits are used to represent more complex information. Transistors are combined to create logic gates which still do very simple stuff.

For example, an AND Gate sends an output of 1 if all of its inputs are 1, and an output of 0 otherwise. Combinations of logic gates finally form meaningful modules, say, for adding two numbers. Once you can add, you can also multiply, and once you can multiply, you can basically do anything. Since all basic operations are literally simpler than first-grade math, you can imagine a computer as a group of 7-year-olds answering really basic math questions. 

A large enough bunch of them could compute anything from astrophysics to Zelda. However, with parts getting tinier and tinier, quantum physics are making things tricky. In a nutshell, a transistor is just an electric switch. Electricity is electrons moving from one place to another. So, a switch is a passage that can block electrons from moving in one direction.

Today, a typical scale for transistors is 14 nanometers, which is about 8 times less than the HIV virus’ diameter, and 500 times smaller than a red blood cell. As transistors are shrinking to the size of only a few atoms, electrons may just transfer themselves to the other side of a blocked passage via a process called Quantum Tunneling.

In the quantum realm, physics works quite differently from the predictable ways we’re used to,

and traditional computers just stop making sense. We are approaching a real physical barrier to our technological progress. To solve this problem, scientists are trying to use these unusual quantum properties to their advantage by building quantum computers. In normal computers, bits are the smallest unit of information.

Quantum computers use qubits which can also be set to one of two values. A qubit can be any two-level quantum system, such as a spin and a magnetic field, or a single photon. 0 and 1 are this system’s possible states, like the photons horizontal or vertical polarization. In the quantum world, the qubit doesn’t have to be just one of those, it can be in any proportions of both states at once. This is called superposition. But as soon as you test its value, say, by sending the photon through a filter, it has to decide to be either vertically or horizontally polarized. So as long as it’s unobserved, the qubit is in a superposition of probabilities for 0 and 1, and you can’t predict which it’ll be. But the instant you measure it, it collapses into one of the definite states.

Superposition is a game changer. Four classical bits can be in one of two to the power of four different configurations at a time. That’s 16 possible combinations, out of which you can use just one. Four qubits in superposition, however, can be in all of those 16 combinations at once. This number grows exponentially with each extra qubit. Twenty of them can already store a million values in parallel. A really weird and unintuitive property qubits can have is Entanglement, a close connection that makes each of the qubits react to a change in the other’s state instantaneously, no matter how far they are apart. This means when measuring just one entangled qubit, you can directly deduce properties of its partners without having to look. 

Qubit Manipulation is a mind bender as well. A normal Logic gate gets a simple set of inputs and produces one definite output. A quantum gate manipulates an input of superpositions, rotates probabilities, and produces another superposition as its output. So a quantum computer sets up some qubits, applies quantum gates to entangle them and manipulate probabilities, then finally measures the outcome, collapsing superpositions to an actual sequence of 0s and 1s. What this means is that you get the entire lot of calculations that are possible with your setup, all done at the same time.

Ultimately, you can only measure one of the results and it’ll only probably be the one you want so you may have to double check and try again. But by cleverly exploiting superposition and entanglement, this can be exponentially more efficient than would ever be possible on a normal computer. So, while quantum computers will probably not replace our home computers, in some areas, they are vastly superior. One of them is database searching. To find something in a database, a normal computer may have to test every single one of its entries. 

Quantum computers algorithms need only the square root of that time, which for large databases, is a huge difference. The most famous use of quantum computers is ruining IT security. Right now, your browsing, email, and banking data are being kept secure by an encryption system in which you give everyone a public key to encode messages only you can decode. The problem is that this public key can actually be used to calculate your secret private key. Luckily, doing the necessary math on any normal computer would literally take years of trial and error. But a quantum computer with exponential speed-up could do it in a breeze. Another really exciting new use is simulations.

Simulations of the quantum world are very intense on resources, and even for bigger structures, such as molecules, they often lack accuracy. So why not simulate quantum physics with actual quantum physics? Quantum simulations could provide new insights on proteins that might revolutionize medicine. Right now, we don’t know if quantum computers will be just a specialized tool or a big revolution for humanity. We have no idea where the limits of technology are, and there’s only one way to find out.

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Business

SoftBank to acquire majority stake in WeWork.

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SOFTBANK to Acquire WeWork

SoftBank a Japanese telecoms and Internet Company, which is very intimate and well known for funding and acquiring stakes in various Multi National Companies. SoftBank is about to take over around 50 percent of the company WeWork.

WeWork is an American company founded in 2010 by Adam Neumann and Miguel McKelvey that provides shared Workspaces and Offices to Technology Startups and services for entrepreneurs, freelancers, and startups, small and large Businesses.

SoftBank shares fell 5.4 % and suffered their biggest one-day drop in nearly two years on Wednesday (10 Oct 18′) partly on concerns about the prospects of eight-year-old WeWork whose outlook is tied closely to the ups and downs of the real estate market. Recent technology sector weakness also weighed on SoftBank’s shares, traders said.

WeWork_workspace

One of the sources told that the pricing and other details of WeWork investment are yet to be firmed up and the second source said Softbank is in talks to take a major investment in WeWork.

SoftBank and its giant Vision  Fund invested about $4.4 Billion August 2017 on WeWork and hold 2 board Seats in the Company. And Owns about 20 percent of the company.

Earlier the Wall Street Journal reported Softbank’s investment would be between around $15 billion to $20 billion and is most likely to come from the Softbank’s giant Vision Fund. Earlier June Journal says that the smaller Softbank investment discussion valued WeWork at up to $40 Billion.

wework_image

SoftBank’s other real estate-related investments include Compass, an online real estate marketplace, Katerra, a construction startup, and Indian hotel chain OYO Hotels.

SoftBank Group Corp, Tokyo Stocks

Image Courtesy: Reuters

SoftBank had earlier invested Billions of Dollars in U.S. ride-services firm UBER Technologies but owns a minority stack in the firm.

The Chinese unit of WeWork raised about $500 million in July from the investors including Hony Capital, SoftBank, Trustbridge Partners, to drive and expand its existence in the nation.

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Education

What’s inside your smartphone?

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smartphone,inside view,smartphone inside

As of 2018, there are around 2.5 billion smartphone users in the world. If we broke open all their newest phones, which are just a fraction of the total that’ve been built, and split them into their component parts, that would produce around 85,000 kilograms of gold, 875,000 of silver, and 40 million kilograms of copper. How did this precious cache get into our phones, and can we reclaim it?

Gold, silver, and copper are actually just a few of the 70 or so chemical elements that make up the average smartphone. These can be divided into different groups, two of the most critical being rare earth elements and precious metals. Rare earths are a selection of 17 elements that are actually common in Earth’s crust and are found in many areas across the world in low concentrations. These elements have a huge range of magnetic, phosphorescent, and conductive properties that make them crucial to modern technologies. In fact, of the 17 types of rare earth metals, phones and other electronics may contain up to 16. In smartphones, these create the screen and color display, aid conductivity, and produce the signature vibrations, amongst other things. And yet, crucial as they are, extracting these elements from the earth is linked to some disturbing environmental impacts. Rare earth elements can often be found, but in many areas, it’s not economically feasible to extract them due to low concentrations. Much of the time, extracting them requires a method called open pit mining that exposes vast areas of land. This form of mining destroys huge swaths of natural habitats, and causes air and water pollution, threatening the health of nearby communities.

Another group of ingredients in smartphones comes with similar environmental risks: these are metals such as copper, silver, palladium, aluminum, platinum, tungsten, tin, lead, and gold. We also mine magnesium, lithium, silica, and potassium to make phones, and all of it is associated with vast habitat destruction, as well as air and water pollution. Mining comes with worrying social problems, too, like large-scale human and animal displacement to make way for industrial operations, and frequently, poor working conditions for laborers.

Lastly, phone production also requires petroleum, one of the main drivers of climate change. That entwines our smartphones inextricably with this growing planetary conundrum. And, what’s more, the ingredients we mine to make our phones aren’t infinite. One day, they’ll simply run out, and we haven’t yet discovered effective replacements for some. Despite this, the number of smartphones is on a steady increase; by 2019 it’s predicted that there’ll be close to 3 billion in use.

This means that reclaiming the bounty within our phones is swiftly becoming a necessity. So, if you have an old phone,you might want to consider your options before throwing it away. To minimize waste, you could donate it to a charity for reuse,take it to an e-waste recycling facility, or look for a company that refurbishes old models. However, even recycling companies need our scrutiny. Just as the production of smartphones comes with social and environmental problems, dismantling them does too. E-waste is sometimes intentionally exported to countries where labor is cheap but working conditions are poor. Vast work forces, often made up of women and children, may be underpaid, lack the training to safely disassemble phones, and be exposed to elements like lead and mercury, which can permanently damage their nervous systems. Phone waste can also end up in huge dump sites, leaching toxic chemicals into the soil and water, mirroring the problems of the mines where the elements originated. A phone is much more than it appears to be on the surface. It’s an assemblage of elements from multiple countries, linked to impacts that are unfolding on a global scale. So, until someone invents a completely sustainable smartphone, we’ll need to come to terms with how this technology affects widespread places and people

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Business

Drop in shares of Tesla after SEC charges CEO Elon Musk with Fraud

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Elon Musk

On the last Thursday, Tesla shares dropped more than around 13 percent after the US Securities and Exchange Commission filed securities fraud charges against Chief Executive Elon Musk.

According to SEC, the tweets posted by Elon Musk were ‘false and misleading‘ and so files fraud charges against Musk. Musk Tweeted on August 7, that he had secured funding for taking the Company private at $420 per share.

 

Security and Exchange Commision said that the tweet let to the “Significant Market Disruption” is seeking civil penalties without noting an amount and to bar Elon from serving as an officer of a Public Company.

That Thursday afternoon Musk sent a statement calling it as an unjustified action.

The statement that Musk gave:

“This unjustified action by the SEC leaves me deeply saddened and disappointed. I have always taken action in the best interests of truth, transparency and investors. Integrity is the most important value in my life and the facts will show I never compromised this in any way.”

Elon Musk tweeted in August for considering taking the company Tesla private, which was not embraced by the Tesla board members and many shareholders, and eventually arouse SEC to investigate.

Later on August 24, after the news of the SEC quest had become known, Musk blogged here that the Tesla will remain a Public Company.

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